Press Releases

ENERGY AND WATER DEVELOPMENT
FY 2011 APPROPRIATIONS REQUESTS

Agency:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Project Title:  Aliso Creek Mainstem, Orange County, CA
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Orange County, CA
Amount Requested:  $850,000

Rapid urbanization of the Aliso Creek watershed has led to a variety of erosion and water quality problems.  This project will provide stream bank stabilization, ecosystem restoration, utility infrastructure protection, and water quality improvements.  The project includes grade control measures to minimize the erosion potential from storm flows in the stream, and low profile pool and riffle structures to allow for fish passage.  Existing utility infrastructure will be protected within the creek banks, and a water quality treatment plant will be built near the mouth of the creek. This project is a beneficial use of taxpayer funding because it will improve the physical, biological and economic conditions of the creek, its surrounding watershed, and the adjacent coastal environment.

 

Project Title:  American River Watershed (Common Features)
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Sacramento, CA
Amount Requested:  $30,000,000

This project will provide flood damage reduction improvements along the lower American River, the Sacramento River, and the Natomas Cross Canal.  It will significantly reduce the possibility of loss of life and flood damage by improving the levee system protecting the Sacramento Metropolitan area from flooding. This reduced risk means a diminished chance that the federal government will need to provide federal disaster relief, thus reducing the burden on taxpayers. The President’s Budget includes $4.2 million for this project.

 

Project Title:  American River Watershed (Folsom Dam Modification Project)
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  American River, 29-miles upstream of Sacramento, CA
Amount Requested:  $100,000,000

The modifications to Folsom Dam will increase the discharge capacity during the early part of flood operations, allowing Folsom Reservoir to have increased storage available during the peak of a storm and reducing the chance of flooding in Sacramento. Since the federal government provides emergency disaster relief to areas in the event of flooding, this project will potentially save taxpayers billions of dollars, by mitigating the damage a flood could cause. The President’s Budget includes $78 million for this project.

 

Project Title: American River Watershed (Folsom Dam Raise)
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Sacramento, CA
Amount Requested:  $5,000,000

Raising Folsom Dam is a key component of reducing Sacramento’s flood risk because it will increase Folsom Dam's ability to control larger floods. Widespread flooding along the American River would cover approximately 86 square miles of Sacramento, affecting 330,000 residents and $16 billion in public and private property.  Since the federal government provides emergency disaster relief to areas in the event of flooding, this project will potentially save taxpayers billions of dollars, by mitigating the damage a flood could cause. The President’s Budget includes $500,000 for this project.

 

Project Title:  Arroyo Seco Watershed, CA
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Los Angeles, CA
Amount Requested:  $500,000

The Arroyo Seco is one of ten model watersheds designated in California by the Wayne Watershed Act.  In 2002, the Army Corps initiated the Arroyo Seco Watershed Restoration Feasibility Study, which assessed resource challenges including flood and stream management, habitat restoration, water resources and recreational opportunities in the watershed and identified goals and projects for conservation, better management, and restoration.  The requested funding will be used by the Army Corps to complete the feasibility study for restoration of the natural hydrologic functioning of the watershed, management of water resources and water quality improvement, and habitat restoration.  Taxpayers will benefit from this project by avoiding larger costs incurred later if this project is not completed and flooding damages the surrounding area, causing the federal government to pay emergency disaster assistance.

 

Project Title: Bay Farm Island Dike
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Alameda, CA
Amount Requested:  $1,000,000

Funding is for improvements to the City of Alameda’s dikes and floodwalls, to protect the city during severe storms. This project will benefit taxpayers because it will reduce the threat of flooding and thus, reduce the potential costs to taxpayers for property damage resulting from such flooding.


Project Title: CalFed Levee Stability Program
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, CA
Amount Requested:  $20,000,000

These funds provide the Army Corps with the resources to fix the levees in the Delta most in need of improvements, as provided for in the CalFed Restoration Act. Providing this funding is in the interest of the taxpayer because of the significant risk to California’s water supply, should levees break in the Delta. The impacts of a levee break due to flood or earthquake on life, property, water supply, and on the Delta ecosystem would be far greater than costs of preventative rehabilitation activities.


Project Title:  California (Section 5039)
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Statewide
Amount Requested:  $40,000,000

This program will allow the Army Corps of Engineers to provide assistance to water and wastewater projects in California. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will ensure that projects meet important environmental safety standards from design through implementation.


Project Title: Central Valley Integrated Flood Management Study
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Sacramento and San Joaquin River Basins, CA
Amount Requested:  $1,000,000

This study, formerly called the Sacramento - San Joaquin Comprehensive Study, will develop a system-wide, comprehensive flood management plan for California’s Central Valley to reduce flood damage and to integrate ecosystem restoration. This proposed project will benefit the taxpayer by significantly reducing the risks posed by flood, thus limiting the potential for damage to persons or property and the cost of emergency assistance to the federal government, while also restoring and protecting environmental features including wetlands and fish and wildlife habitat.

 

Project Title: Colorado Lagoon Restoration
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Long Beach, CA
Amount Requested:  $1,044,794

Federal funding will be used to dredge polluted sediments from the Lagoon and re-slope portions of the Lagoon’s shore to allow replanting with native wetland plants. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because restoring this lagoon will protect plants and animals that are facing extinction, while improving its recreational function. It will also benefit taxpayers by enhancing the Lagoon’s water quality, providing cleaner water that will benefit the larger habitat area and user base.

 

Project Title: Contra Costa Canal Emergency Flood Control Project
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Contra Costa County, CA
Amount Requested:  $10,000,000

These funds will be used to replace eight miles of the Contra Costa Canal, a federally-owned facility, with a buried pipeline. This project is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will provide immediate flood protection for 550,000 residents in Contra Costa Water District’s service area, residents of Brentwood and Oakley that live near the levees, and will improve water quality.

 

Project Title: Corte Madera Creek
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Marin County, CA
Amount Requested:  $750,000

These improvements to Corte Madera Creek flood control will increase protection for the people and property in the surrounding region, which will benefit taxpayers by mitigating the damage should flooding occur.

 

Project Title: Cosgrove Creek
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Calaveras County, CA
Amount Requested:  $200,000

This project targets one of the most flood prone areas of Calaveras County, where three local communities experience periodic flooding from Cosgrove Creek.  This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will provide greater protection to persons and property from flooding. In addition to providing enhanced safety from flooding, the project will enhance riparian habitat and create recreational hiking trails and athletic fields.

 

Project Title:  Coyote and Berryessa Creeks, CA
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Santa Clara County, CA
Amount Requested:  $500,000

Severe flooding occurs along both Coyote and Berryessa Creeks approximately every four years.  A January 1997 flood, the highest on record for the area since completion of Anderson Dam in 1950, inflicted millions of dollars worth of damages on local residents, businesses, and the area’s infrastructure.  The first phase of this project, providing 100-year flood protection along Coyote Creek, was completed in 1996, and already demonstrated its effectiveness by substantially mitigating damage during the 1997 flood. 

Funding will be used to complete design of the second phase along the Berryessa element, which drains a 22-square mile area in the City of Milpitas and portions of San Jose, following the completion of the General Reevaluation Report.  Flood protection features will include setback levees, floodwalls, an overflow channel, and two sedimentation basins.  Provisions are also included for fish and wildlife mitigation, including appropriate aquatic and riparian habitat restoration, fish passages, and sediment control structures to protect and enhance water quality.  This project is a valuable use of taxpayer funding because it will safeguard area residents, businesses, and infrastructure.  In addition, the project will provide significant environmental benefits, such as increased riparian habitat, improved fish passage for numerous federally-listed endangered species and the ability to control sediment flow along the creek.

 

Project Title: Coyote Valley Dam Feasibility Study
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location: Mendocino County, CA
Amount Requested:  $1,000,000

Lake Mendocino, a multipurpose facility providing flood control and water supply benefits, was created with the construction of Coyote Valley Dam.  The Coyote Valley Dam Feasibility Study will evaluate the practicality of raising the dam and other alternatives for increasing the Coyote Valley Dam water supply. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because this additional water is needed to meet the current and future water demands of Mendocino, Sonoma, and Marin Counties.  The President’s Budget includes $90,000 for this project.


Project Title: Coyote Valley Dam, Lake Mendocino (Operations and Maintenance)
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Mendocino County, CA
Amount Requested:  $11,133,000

Coyote Valley Dam is the primary water source sustaining flow in the upper Russian River in the late summer and fall, critical time periods for Chinook salmon migration and agricultural diversions. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because modifications and procedural changes in dam operations will support salmon restoration programs and comply with the Endangered Species Act. The President’s Budget includes $3.652 million for this project.

 

Project Title:  Dam Safety Assurance Program
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Nationwide
Amount Requested:  $70,400,000

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers conducts routine surveillance and inspections through its national Dam Safety Assurance Program (DSAP) to ensure the integrity and viability of dams such that they do not present unacceptable risks to the public, property, or the environment.  This program includes the 75 highest priority dams nationwide requiring remediation, primarily dealing with seepage and seismic problems that are a danger to the communities they protect.  The DSAP program is a beneficial use of taxpayer funding because of the significant damage to people and property that would result from the potential failure of a dam.  It is of the utmost importance to the public that the Army Corps reduces, eliminates, or remediates to the extent possible, any unacceptable risks to dam safety across the nation.

 

Project Title: Dana Point Harbor
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Dana Point, CA
Amount Requested:  $600,000

Due to its breakwater’s current configuration, Dana Point Harbor has restricted water circulation which results in diminished water quality, causing some danger to the public. This study is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will lead to improvements that will protect public health.

 

Project Title: Dry Creek (Warm Springs) Lake and Channel (Operations and Maintenance)
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Sonoma County, CA
Amount Requested:  $19,756,000

This operations and maintenance funding is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it assures continued safe operation of Warm Springs Dam on Lake Sonoma. The President’s Budget includes $19.756 million for this project.

 

Project Title: Farmington Recharge
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:   Stockton, CA
Amount Requested:  $2,000,000

Funding will be used to continue a demonstration program to flood contained fields in the Eastern San Joaquin County Basin to recharge the groundwater supply, which has been overdrafted by 135 acre feet per year. An additional 70,000 acre-feet per year is needed to provide an underground hydraulic barrier to further prevent saline water intrusion and contamination.  This project is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will protect private and public property.

 

Project Title:  Goleta Beach
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Goleta, CA
Amount Requested:  $4,700,000

Goleta Beach is a 29-acre park located in the unincorporated area of Santa Barbara County that provides recreational opportunities to over 1.5 million visitors per year. Several major storms have eroded the beach, resulting in the loss of coastal recreation and other park amenities.  The project is envisioned as a permeable pile pier and beach nourishment to provide a long-term solution to ongoing beach erosion.  These improvements will create and maintain a wider beach for shore protection and recreation and prevent future loss of sand. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because the project will mitigate damage from storms and reduce erosion.

 

Project Title:  Guadalupe River
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  San Jose, CA
Amount Requested:  $200,000

This project will provide 100-year flood protection for downtown San Jose’s technology and commercial industries, over 3,270 homes, four major traffic arteries and San Jose International Airport. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will prevent potential damages from a flood, which could exceed hundreds of millions of dollars.

 

Project Title:  Hamilton Airfield Wetlands Restoration
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Marin County, CA
Amount Requested:  $20,000,000

The project site on San Pablo Bay includes 988 acres of a former military airfield and adjacent state lands.  Funding will be used to continue burying the main runway and ancillary taxiways with clean sediment from Bay Area dredging projects. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will provide nearly 700 acres of restored tidal and seasonal wetlands, which will act as habitat for a number of threatened and endangered species, and a disposal site for dredged material. The President’s Budget includes $20 million for this project.

 

Project Title:  Hamilton City
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Hamilton City, CA
Amount Requested:  $15,059,000

This project includes construction of 6.8 miles of levees to provide a more reliable form of flood protection for Hamilton City which has been evacuated six times in 25 years because of flood danger. This project will benefit taxpayers because the federal government provides disaster relief when flooding occurs.  These public safety improvements will potentially save the taxpayer money by diminishing the frequency and significance of damage caused by flooding in this region.

 

Project Title:  Harbor/South Bay Water Recycling Study, Los Angeles
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Los Angeles County, CA
Amount Requested:  $3,000,000

The Harbor/South Bay Water Recycling Project will annually develop and convey up to 48,000 acre-feet of recycled water for municipal, industrial, and environmental purposes in the Los Angeles Basin. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because, in addition to providing less expensive water supplies, the project will reduce the demand for imported water while also reducing discharges into Santa Monica Bay.

 

Project Title:  Humboldt Harbor and Bay (Operations and Maintenance)
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Eureka, CA
Amount Requested:  $8,558,000

After a 12-year process, the Humboldt Bay Channel Deepening Project was completed in April 2000.  The new 48-foot deep Bar and Entrance Channels and 38-foot deep North Bay and Samoa Channels provide for greater navigation safety and improved vessel economics. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because adequate maintenance dredging sustains commerce in the channels and improves navigation safety and environmental protection. The President’s Budget includes $5.848 million for this project.

 

Project Title:  Imperial Beach – Silver Strand Shoreline Protection, CA
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Imperial, CA
Amount Requested:  $2,000,000

The Imperial Beach shoreline has been heavily impacted by erosion, which is caused by a lack of sediment transfer from the Tijuana River and San Diego Harbor due to dam and jetty impediments.  The sources of this erosion are a federal jetty protecting the San Diego harbor and three dams on the Tijuana River, two of which are federal.  Funding would provide the federal portion for the placement of beach sand to protect private and public property and preserve recreational opportunities.  This project is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will help protect the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve (a National Wildlife Refuge) and help the City continue its growth into a prosperous community.

 

Project Title:  Las Gallinas Creek/Santa Venetia Levee
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Santa Venetia, CA
Amount Requested:  $500,000

The community of Santa Venetia is protected from the San Francisco Bay with five pump stations and an extensive levee system.  The levees were last repaired in 1983 and have deteriorated to such a point that rehabilitation and restoration is imminently needed. Unless corrective measures are taken, levee failures or overflow could occur, leading to significant damage. Should this occur, much of the cost of property loss will fall to the federal government, in the form of federal disaster assistance. Therefore, it is in the interest of the taxpayer to ensure that measures are taken to mitigate this risk.

 

Project Title:  Llagas Creek
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Santa Clara County, CA
Amount Requested:  $2,000,000

The Llagas Creek Flood Protection Project will provide critical flood protection along 104 miles of watershed including residential, commercial and agricultural developments.  This project will also protect and improve water quality, and preserve the river’s habitat for fish and other wildlife. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will provide flood protection for 1,100 homes, 500 businesses, and over 1,300 acres of agricultural land in Santa Clara County.

 

Project Title:  Long Beach Breakwater Study
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Long Beach, CA
Amount Requested:  $1,000,000

The Long Beach Breakwater is a federally-owned and operated structure, completed in 1949, which prevents wave action along much of the City of Long Beach’s coastline.  This study will determine if there are ways to reconfigure the breakwater to provide surf to the shore, while continuing to protect navigation, coastal zones, and property.  This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will significantly improve beach and water quality.


Project Title:  Los Angeles County Drainage Area
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Los Angeles County, CA
Amount Requested:  $1,200,000

Compton Creek and Dominguez Channel were designed and constructed to provide a specific level of flood protection.  Over time, urbanization and development of the tributary watersheds have reduced the level of protection due to the increased amount of runoff that the channels must convey.  The requested funds will be used by the Army Corps for the Reconnaissance Study to review both Compton Creek and Dominguez Channel to assess the current level of flood protection and identify environmental enhancement opportunities.  These findings will be used to plan a project to increase flood protection for the adjacent communities, thus reducing or eliminating property owners’ need to purchase mandatory flood insurance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency.  This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will increase flood protection for area residents.

 

Project Title: Los Angeles County Drainage Area (LACDA) Water Conservation and Supply, Hansen Dam Feasibility Study
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Los Angeles County, CA
Amount Requested:  $200,000

This project will result in an increase in local water supply by allowing water to be stored behind the dam and slowly released downstream to be recharged into the groundwater aquifer. These changes will also reduce the region’s reliance on imported water by increasing local supply and improving water supply reliability. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will reduce the region’s reliance on imported water from several States by increasing local supply, thereby improving water supply reliability for the region as a whole.

 

Project Title:  Lower Cache Creek, Yolo County, Woodland and Vicinity
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Yolo County, CA
Amount Requested:  $100,000

The purpose of this project is to investigate the feasibility of increasing flood protection for the City of Woodland and the town of Yolo to 100-year storm level protection, from its current 10-year flood level protection. This feasibility study will benefit taxpayers both by preventing larger costs in the future, should flood protection not be implemented, and by determining the most effective and environmentally beneficial method of implanting these protections.

 

Project Title:  Lower Mission Creek
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Santa Barbara, CA
Amount Requested:  $1,000,000

This project will reduce the serious flood threat to a significant portion of downtown Santa Barbara by improving key channel locations with widening and bridge replacements. This funding will enable the Army Corps to complete pre-engineering and design work. This project is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will protect residential, commercial, and public property that are subject to major damages during floods, as well as adjacent agricultural lands.

 

Project Title:  Lower Walnut Creek
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Contra Costa County, CA
Amount Requested:  $600,000

The Lower Walnut Creek Project is a reevaluation study of a channel constructed in the 1960s, necessary to respond to new endangered species listings and regulatory requirements that restrict traditional channel operation and maintenance. The study is intended to identify channel modifications that will allow the local sponsor to maintain the channel flood conveyance while meeting regulatory requirements and enhancing wildlife habitat. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will enhance flood protection in this region, while promoting environmental benefits and protecting this important wetland and its inhabitant species.

 

Project Title: Malibu Creek Watershed
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Los Angeles and Ventura Counties, CA
Amount Requested:  $210,000

This study will develop methods to manage the flow of sediment currently blocked by the obsolete Rindge Dam, which creates a barrier to spawning grounds for the endanger Steelhead trout.  This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because this project will restore habitat critical to endangered and threatened species, and provide sediment for beach renourishment.  The President’s Budget includes $210,000 for this project.

 

Project Title:  Marina del Rey (Operations and Maintenance)
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Los Angeles County, CA
Amount Requested:  $11,950,000

The Marina del Rey south entrance and main channel are federally-maintained facilities. Dredging of the channel is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because the south entrance and main channel must be dredged in order to avoid critical blockage and harmful impacts to navigation.  The President’s Budget includes $2.05 million for this project.

 

Project Title:  Matilija Dam
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Ventura County, CA
Amount Requested:  $1,000,000

The Matilija Dam Ecosystem Restoration Project involves the removal of the Matilija Dam on a tributary of the Ventura River in Ventura County, CA.  The project will reestablish runs of the endangered southern steelhead and allow sand to flow to coastal beaches.  The reservoir behind the dam is filled with sediment and the facility no longer serves its original purpose. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will support critical habitat for native species, protect this wild and scenic river by restoring sediment flow, construct levees to protect surrounding property, and remove invasive plant species.

 

Project Title:  Merced County Streams
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Merced County, CA
Amount Requested:  $500,000

This project will provide flood protection to residential, commercial, and agricultural lands adjacent to the cities of Merced and Atwater. This area’s flood protection is currently at a 50-year storm level. Funding will be used to re-scope the study area to reduce the cost of the project, and to provide 200-year level flood protection to the area. Unless corrective measures are taken, dam and levee failures could occur, leading to catastrophic damage.  Should this occur, much of the cost of property loss will fall to the federal government, in the form of federal disaster assistance. Therefore, it is in the interest of the taxpayer to ensure that measures are taken to mitigate this risk. The President’s Budget includes $401,000 for this project.

 

Project Title:  Middle Creek Flood Damage Reduction and Ecosystem Restoration
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Middle Creek, CA
Amount Requested:  $1,200,000

This project will both reduce potential flood damages and restore fish and wildlife habitat, with 14.4 miles of levees on Middle Creek and Scotts Creek, tributaries to Clear Lake. Taxpayers will benefit from this project by avoiding larger costs incurred later if this project is not competed and flooding damages the surrounding area, requiring federal emergency disaster assistance.

 

Project Title:  Mid-Valley Area Levee Reconstruction
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Sacramento Valley, CA
Amount Requested:  $11,000,000

The purpose of this project is to reconstruct levees on the Feather and Sacramento Rivers and tributaries that protect over 93,000 acres in five Sacramento Valley counties, with an estimated property value of $97.4 million.  Without these necessary levee improvements, this area is endangered by flooding, and the taxpayer will bear much of the cost through federal emergency assistance. It is therefore in the interest of the American taxpayer to provide funding for this project, to mitigate future flood damage and costs.

 

Project Title:  Morro Bay Harbor (Operations and Maintenance)
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Morro Bay, CA
Amount Requested:  $2,390,000

Funding will be used to dredge the entrance and federally designated navigation channels at Morro Bay Harbor. Dredging is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will ensure adequate navigational depths for Harbor safety, commerce and operations for Coast Guard Station Morro Bay. The President’s Budget includes $1.59 million for this project.

 

Project Title:  Murrieta Creek
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Cities of Murrieta and Temecula, CA
Amount Requested:  $17,000,000

The Murrieta Creek Flood Control project will provide 100-year flood protection and environmental restoration to the cities of Murrieta and Temecula.  The project is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will provide flood control for these two communities.

 

Project Title:  Napa River
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Napa County, CA
Amount Requested:  $6,000,000

The Napa River Flood Protection Project will provide 100-year flood protection to the City of Napa, protecting business and residences, and improving water quality, creating urban wetlands, enhancing wildlife habitats, and creating over 730 acres of tidal wetlands. It is therefore in the interest of the American taxpayer to provide funding for this project, to mitigate future flood damage.

 

Project Title:  Napa River (Operations and Maintenance)
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Napa County, CA
Amount Requested:  $4,341,000

Recent flood events have resulted in significant accumulations of sediment, which has impacted boat traffic in this riverbed. Dredging the river is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will mitigate damage from flooding.

 

Project Title:  Napa River Salt Marsh Restoration
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Napa County, CA
Amount Requested:  $12,000,000

The project is part of a larger environmental restoration effort to restore the nation’s second largest estuary, and its watershed, to its natural state. Funds would allow the Army Corps to initiate construction of habitat restoration and salinity reduction in former salt ponds. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will support critical habitat for threatened and endangered species and protect sensitive habitats. The President’s Budget includes $12 million for this project.

 

Project Title: Newport Bay Harbor
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Newport, CA
Amount Requested:  $23,710,000

Limited maintenance dredging was last performed in 2003. Over the past several years, the harbor’s federally authorized channel has experienced significant shoaling, impacting all boat traffic – in some areas less than five feet of depth is available. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because dredging will provide full access to the harbor, which is home to a U.S. Coast Guard station. The U.S. Coast Guard has a cutter permanently stationed in the harbor. The President’s Budget includes $1.28 million for this project.

 

Project Title:  Northern Half Moon Bay Shoreline Improvement, CA
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  San Mateo County, CA
Amount Requested:  $300,000

Since the construction of the Pillar Point Harbor breakwater by the Army Corps of Engineers, shoreline erosion immediately south of the breakwater has increased, resulting in the destruction of one road, threats to California Highway 1 and several other structures, and the loss of recreational public beach.   An appraisal by the Army Corps in 2009 concluded that there is sufficient cause for Federal interest in a shoreline improvement project. 

The requested funding would allow for an investigation of remedial approaches and identify a preferred alternative with the goal of insuring that the breakwater performs as intended.  The project goal is to investigate and demonstrate beneficial approaches to shoreline sand replenishment that would enable the breakwater to function effectively, and reduce the negative effects of coastal erosion.  This is a beneficial use of taxpayer funding because it will improve navigational safety and optimize Harbor use, demonstrate shoreline erosion control alternatives that may have further applicability elsewhere, and sustain the area’s economic activity.  Additionally, the erosion currently threatens the security of State Highway 1, the only north-south traffic artery in the region.

 

Project Title:  Noyo River and Harbor
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Fort Bragg, CA
Amount Requested:  $4,500,000

Noyo Harbor is the only improved harbor within 250 miles of Fort Bragg, and supports a U.S. Coast Guard Search and Rescue Station, as well as commercial fishing. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because regular dredging maintains the federal channel and the ability of the Coast Guard to operate from this location.

 

Project Title: Oakland Harbor (50 Foot Project)
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Port of Oakland, CA
Amount Requested:  $4,330,000

The Port of Oakland is the fourth busiest point of entry for containerized cargo in the nation, but the existing harbor channels can no longer adequately accommodate the latest generation of container vessels.  These funds will allow for the continued construction of a 50-foot depth channel and related harbor enhancement. Army Corps analysis shows an 11:1 cost-benefit ratio, the highest of any deep draft project in the President’s budget. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because expanding the harbor channel will allow the harbor to accommodate modern container vessels. The President’s Budget includes $4.33 million for this project.

 

Project Title: Oakland Harbor (Operations and Maintenance)
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Port of Oakland, CA
Amount Requested:  $7,500,000

The requested funds will cover costs of maintaining the channels, together with other maintenance projects in the Oakland Harbor including Coast Guard Island. The Port of Oakland is the third busiest container port on the West Coast and plays a crucial role as a major international trade gateway to our nation.  This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because maintenance dredging of the Oakland Harbor is required to maintain the Port’s authorized depth and is a critical element in maintaining the nation’s overall current shipping capacity. The President’s Budget includes $7.5 million for this project.

 

Project Title: Oceanside Harbor
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Oceanside, CA
Amount Requested:  $2,508,000

Funding will provide for maintenance dredging for the entrance to Oceanside Harbor and the Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton Harbor. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because regular dredging will reduce storm damage, provide surge protection to the harbor's infrastructure, and provide significant reduction of navigational hazards. The President’s Budget includes $1.52 million for this project.

 

Project Title:  Oceanside Shoreline Special Study, CA
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Oceanside, CA
Amount Requested:  $800,000

Oceanside has a 57-year history of beach erosion resulting from the Camp Pendleton Harbor construction in 1942.  The Water Resources Development Act of 2000 authorized the City of Oceanside to mitigate the erosion and other impacts resulting from the construction of Camp Pendleton Harbor, and to restore beach conditions along the affected public and private shores.  Despite numerous efforts to replace beach sand and periodic nourishment of sand from maintenance dredging of the harbor, a permanent solution to the massive erosion problem has yet to be achieved.  This request will fund ongoing costs of studying of planned alternatives, including a beach fill and a submerged breakwater system.  This study is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will seek a solution to mitigate the erosion and to restore conditions along the affected public and private beaches to the conditions that existed before the construction, providing opportunities for development and recreation.

 

Project Title:  Oil Piers Beach Renourishment
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Ventura County, CA
Amount Requested:  $5,000,000

This project will provide storm surge protection and control shoreline erosion on the Ventura County coast. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will protect public and private property.

 

Project Title:  Oyster Point Marina/Park Breakwater Reconfiguration
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  San Mateo County, CA
Amount Requested:  $400,000

This project will provide increased protection for Oyster Point Marina from storm damage. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will protect public and private property.


Project Title:  Pajaro River
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Counties of Monterey and Santa Cruz, CA
Amount Requested:  $5,000,000

The Army Corps is conducting a study to improve flood control on the lower Pajaro River. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will increase flood control protection from its current 15-year flood level to 50-year flood protection.

 

Project Title:  Petaluma River Flood Control
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Petaluma, CA
Amount Requested:  $951,000

The requested federal funding will complete the Petaluma River Flood Control Project and ensure the 100-year flood design capacity of the new channel. Reducing flood risk to people, property, and infrastructure along the Petaluma River will benefit taxpayers by mitigating the potential for catastrophic flooding.

 

Project Title:  Petaluma River (Operations and Maintenance)
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Petaluma, CA
Amount Requested:  $7,340,000

This project will provide dredging of the Petaluma River to ensure navigability and flood conveyance capacity of the river channel. This project is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because the continued maintenance dredging of the Petaluma River is essential for water traffic flows in the region.

 

Project Title:  Pillar Point Harbor
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  San Mateo County, CA
Amount Requested:  $1,200,000

This project will continue repairs to the Pillar Point Harbor breakwater, which will prevent further shoreline erosion. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will improve navigational safety, protect existing infrastructure, and maintain water-borne commerce and fishing that use the harbor.


Project Title:  Pinole Shoal Management, Delta Long Term Management Strategy
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta and San Francisco Bay, CA
Amount Requested:  $2,500,000

There is an ongoing need to dredge Bay and Delta channels for navigation, water conveyance, flood control and levee maintenance. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because of these multiple public benefits.

 

Project Title:  Pismo Beach
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Pismo Beach, CA
Amount Requested:  $4,339,406

Erosion of shoreline bluffs at Pismo Beach is resulting in road closings and utility relocations.  If it is allowed to continue, this shoreline erosion will result in further infrastructure deterioration and threatens public and private property, including Highway 101. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because without the necessary improvements, public and private property will be damaged or lost.

 

Project Title:  Placer County
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:   Placer County, CA
Amount Requested:  $2,000,000

Funding will be used to construct two regional treatment plants and main water transmission line to bring Placer County into compliance with state water quality standards. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because this project will serve 200,000 residents by providing a new source of 30,000 acre-feet of reclaimed water.

 

Project Title:  Redwood City Harbor
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  The Port of Redwood City, CA
Amount Requested:  $800,000

The Port of Redwood City handles construction material destined for Silicon Valley and Northern California, but it only has a 30-foot deep channel. Funding is needed to continue the Feasibility Study to determine the optimum depth for Redwood City Navigation Channels. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will allow the port to accommodate bulk vessels that have increased in size to maximize efficiency and reduce costs.

 

Project Title:  Redwood City Harbor (Operations and Maintenance)
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  The Port of Redwood City, CA
Amount Requested:  $1,000,000

Funding is requested to dredge Redwood City Navigation Channel to its authorized depth of -30 feet.  Dredging was last completed in December 2008.  At that time, however, funding was insufficient to return the Channel to authorized depth. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will ensure that the port can accommodate larger modern vessels. The President’s Budget includes $6.745 million for this project.

 

Project Title:  Restoration of Abandoned Mines (RAMs)
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Nationwide
Amount Requested:  $4,200,000

These funds would support the immediate priorities identified by Federal and State agencies for mine cleanup nationwide. There are an estimated 500,000 abandoned hardrock mines in the Western United States, 47,000 of which are in California alone.  Many of these abandoned sites pose public safety threats, such as rotting structures or hidden shafts, or contain hazardous chemicals and dangerous gases that threaten public health.  This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because cleaning up these hazardous sites will provide important environmental and public health benefits.

 

Project Title:  Sacramento Deepwater Ship Channel
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta and San Francisco Bay, CA
Amount Requested:  $12,500,000

The Sacramento River Deepwater Ship Channel provides access from the Port of Sacramento to Bay Area harbors and the Pacific Ocean.  This project will deepen the channel, adding an additional five-feet in depth. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because the project will improve regional goods movement and channel operations. The President’s Budget includes $12.5 million for this project.

 

Project Title:  Sacramento River Bank Protection Project
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Sacramento, CA
Amount Requested:  $10,000,000

Funding will be used to repair critical erosion sites along the levees and banks of the Sacramento River identified by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the California Department of Water Resources, and the Central Valley Flood Protection Board. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because without considerable corrective measures, levee failures could occur, leading to catastrophic damage, with much of the cost to respond coming from federal emergency disaster assistance. The President’s Budget includes $10 million for this project.

 

Project Title:  Sacramento River Flood Control Systems Evaluation
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Sacramento, CA
Amount Requested:  $1,200,000

This study will set out options to mitigate the high risk of flooding that the greater Sacramento area faces, as repeatedly demonstrated in floods throughout the past two decades. The outcomes of this study will inform decisions for the protection of two million residents behind these levees.

 

Project Title:  Sacramento River, Glenn-Colusa Irrigation District
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Sacramento, CA
Amount Requested:  $1,500,000

Stabilizing the river level on the Sacramento River near Hamilton City is an essential component of the Glenn-Colusa Irrigation District Fish Screen Improvement Project. It will preserve the agricultural irrigation supplies to roughly 1,200 farm families, while complying with the federal Endangered Species Act and contributing to the restoration of anadromous fish species in the Sacramento River.  Taxpayers will benefit from funding the correction of the deficiencies in this project’s original design, which, once corrected, will ensure the continued operation of the pumping facility and the anadromous fish restoration program.

 

Project Title:  Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Islands and Levees
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, CA
Amount Requested:  $2,468,000

The study will assess existing and future flood risks in the Delta, as well as opportunities for ecosystem restoration, water supply, navigation, water quality and recreation needs, and develop a comprehensive roadmap for Army Corps involvement in a wide range of water resources issues. Providing funding for this feasibility study is in the interest of the taxpayer because of the significant potential for levee breaks due to flood or earthquake, and the damage that would inflict on life, property, habitat, and the water supply for most of the state. The President’s Budget includes $468,000 for this project.

 

Project Title:  Salton Sea Restoration, CA
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Salton Sea, CA
Amount Requested:  $5,000,000

This project will initiate the Army Corps’ restoration of the Salton Sea’s ecosystem.  This effort will seek to stabilize the Sea’s salinity, conduct shoreline preservation, and revitalize wildlife and fish habitat.  This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because the Salton Sea provides valuable wetland habitat for more than 400 species of migratory and resident birds throughout the Pacific Flyway.  Additionally, this project will provide significant water and air quality improvements, through depth stabilization that will decrease sediment exposure and provide substantial dust mitigation.

 

Project Title:  San Francisco Bay to Stockton
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta and San Francisco Bay Area, CA
Amount Requested:  $1,800,000

This project is a 65-mile long deep draft navigation channel, extending from the Golden Gate Bridge entrance to the Port of Stockton.  Funding in 2011 will go towards reassessing the dredge disposal sites and preparing the General Reevaluation Report and environmental impact statement for deepening the Baldwin Ship Channel, which extends from San Francisco Bay to the Port of Stockton. The existing navigation channel depths are inadequate for efficient movement for commercial and military deep-draft waterborne commerce. This project is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because a deeper channel depth will also allow the Port of Stockton to increase ship traffic.

 

Project Title:  San Francisquito Creek
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Menlo Park, CA
Amount Requested:  $2,000,000

The project will provide critical flood protection for residential, commercial, industrial and institutional developments in both Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will enhance water quality, protect populations of endangered fish and wildlife, and provide increased flood protection for residents.

 

Project Title: San Joaquin River Basin, Frazier Creek / Strathmore Creek
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Tulare County, CA
Amount Requested:  $300,000

The Army Corps has determined that there is federal interest in providing flood control, environmental restoration, and water quality improvements on Frazier and Strathmore Creeks. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will provide flood protection for people, property and infrastructure in Tulare County.

 

Project Title:  San Joaquin River Basin, Lower San Joaquin River
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  San Joaquin County, CA
Amount Requested:  $1,500,000

The purpose of this feasibility study is to determine the most effective course of action for flood damage reduction and ecosystem restoration improvements along the lower San Joaquin River. Reducing flood risk to more than 250,000 residents, property, and infrastructure along the Lower San Joaquin River and major creeks and streams in Stockton and San Joaquin County is a valuable use of taxpayer funds.

 

Project Title:  San Joaquin River, Port of Stockton
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Port of Stockton, CA
Amount Requested:  $10,003,000

The Stockton Channel of the San Joaquin River requires annual maintenance dredging conducted by the Army Corps. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because dredging of the federally authorized Stockton Ship Channel is necessary for the safe movement of deep-draft commercial vessels calling at the fourth busiest California port. The President’s Budget includes $3.603 million for this project.

 

Project Title:  San Joaquin River Basin, West Stanislaus County, Orestimba Creek
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Stanislaus County, CA
Amount Requested:  $864,000

Funding will allow for the completion of a feasibility study to finalize a flood damage reduction plan for Orestimba Creek. The proposed public safety improvements will potentially save the taxpayer million of dollars by diminishing the frequency and significance of damage caused by flooding in this region, increasing flood protection from its current four-year flood level to 100-year level protection.

 

Project Title:  San Joaquin River Basin, White River/Deer Creek
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Tulare, CA
Amount Requested:  $300,000

The frequency of flooding has increased along the White River and Deer Creek. The study will evaluate the feasibility of the project to reduce flood-damage potential. Reducing flood risk to people, property, and infrastructure will benefit taxpayers, by reducing the potential for catastrophic flooding.

 

Project Title:  San Lorenzo River Flood Control Project, CA
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Santa Cruz, CA
Amount Requested:  $500,000

This is an authorized flood control levee project on the San Lorenzo River in Santa Cruz that will provide 100-year flood protection.  Funding will allow the Army Corps to proceed with the fourth phase of the project, which includes flood walls on top of the San Lorenzo River levees, levee toe-drains, a controlled overflow, channel dredging, and habitat restoration.  The largest recorded flood of the river inundated 410 acres, causing approximately $7.6 million in damages.  The project provides flood protection to important residential and commercial areas for the 56,000 residents of Santa Cruz.  Reducing flood risk to people, their property, and infrastructure along the San Lorenzo River will benefit taxpayers by mitigating the potential for catastrophic flooding that will cost the federal government in emergency disaster assistance.

 

Project Title:  San Luis Harbor Dredge Survey, CA
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Avila Beach, CA
Amount Requested:  $3,430,000

Port San Luis Harbor District moves sand on an annual basis to maintain the viability of its boat launch facilities.  The Port experiences problems with shoaling of launch facilities, which severely impact the ability of the commercial fishing fleet, recreational boaters, Harbor Patrol and the Coast Guard to launch, maintain access to the boatyard for repairs, and obtain fuel.  The Port San Luis Harbor has completed sediment analysis and sampling, and obtained all required permits from the Army Corps and the California Coastal Commission.  The requested funding would be used for the required survey of the navigable channel.  This is a beneficial use of taxpayer funding because the Port is home to a viable commercial fishing fleet, provides critical support to the nearby Coast Guard Station at Morro Bay, which assists with off-shore Search and Rescue, and supports the adjacent Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant and security assistance in enforcement of the one mile security zone around the plant.

 

Project Title:  San Luis Rey River
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Oceanside, CA
Amount Requested:  $6,200,000

An emergency clearing of a 200-foot-wide swath of vegetation from the San Luis Rey River is needed to protect the levee, the City of Oceanside’s bridges, utilities, and the public from threatened flooding. This project benefits taxpayers by reducing flood risk and protecting the major southern access roads to Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton.

 

Project Title:  San Pablo Bay and Mare Island Strait
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  San Pablo Bay, CA
Amount Requested:  $5,400,000

This channel, located in San Pablo Bay, is a major arterial for vessel transport through the San Francisco Bay region. This project consists of maintenance dredging of the channel to its authorized depth of minus 35 feet on an annual basis. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because maintenance dredging of Pinole Shoal Channel to its authorized depth is essential to the continued safe transport of crude oil and bulk cargo in Northern California. The President’s Budget includes $2.75 million for this project.

 

Project Title:  San Ramon Valley Recycled Water
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Alameda and Contra Costa counties, CA
Amount Requested:  $458,500

The San Ramon Valley Recycled Water Project will provide a reliable alternative recycled water supply that will conserve drinking water supplies to meet the needs of more than 30,000 people in Alameda and Contra Costa counties.  The recycled water will be used for irrigation of recreational areas and landscaping needs, thereby reducing demand on limited potable water supplies in the East Bay. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will provide recycled water to meet growing water supply demand and reduce demand on limited potable water supply resources in the region. 

 

Project Title:  Santa Ana River Mainstem
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, CA
Amount Requested:  $25,000,000

The Santa Ana River Mainstem Project involves construction of new flood protection structures and improvements to existing structures in Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The potential economic loss due to lack of flood protection is estimated at over $15 billion.  The requested funds will complete the Prado Dam elements of the Mainstem project. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because these improvements will protect more than 3 million residents and 110,000 acres. When flooding occurs, the federal government provides emergency disaster assistance, and therefore, it benefits the taxpayer to mitigate this flood danger before flooding occurs. The President’s Budget includes $25 million for this project.

 

Project Title:  Santa Barbara Harbor
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Santa Barbara, CA
Amount Requested:  $3,750,000

Funding will provide for essential annual maintenance dredging for Santa Barbara Harbor. This dredging is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it is necessary to reduce storm damage, shoaling and navigational hazards. Santa Barbara Harbor also provides a staging area, facilities and resources required for oil spill prevention and response, and is a designated harbor of safe refuge. The President’s Budget includes $2.04 million for this project.

 

Project Title:  Santa Clara River Watershed
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Los Angeles and Ventura Counties, CA
Amount Requested:  $2,000,000

The Santa Clara River Watershed Protection Plan is a cooperative management agreement jointly operated by the Ventura County Watershed Protection District, Los Angeles County, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to protect the Watershed from the continued pressure of urbanization in both Los Angeles and Ventura Counties that may affect the floodplain and environmental resources.   In 2003, these partners signed a Feasibility Cost Share Agreement for the Santa Clara River Watershed Protection Plan.  The requested funding will allow the Army Corps to continue to fund its 50 percent share of the Feasibility Study. The remaining 50 percent local share will be split between Los Angeles County, and the Ventura County Watershed Protection District.  This project is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will protect private and public property.

 

Project Title:  Santa Cruz Harbor Federal Navigation Channel
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Santa Cruz, CA
Amount Requested:  $600,000

The federal navigation channel at Santa Cruz provides access to Santa Cruz Small Craft Harbor, which is a coastal harbor of refuge and home to 1,300 recreational and commercial vessels. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because annual dredging is necessary to provide safe and functional access to this harbor.

 

Project Title:  Solana-Encinitas Shoreline
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Cities of Solana Beach and Encinitas, CA
Amount Requested:  $307,000

The requested funding will be used for a study of shoreline erosion along eight-miles of San Diego County coastline. Bluff erosion is extremely dangerous to the public, as portions of the bluffs have collapsed and threaten private property. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because the project will mitigate damage caused by erosion, and protection for public and private property.  The President’s Budget includes $307,000 for this project.

 

Project Title:  South Perris
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  South Perris, CA
Amount Requested:  $2,000,000

This project will produce potable water from otherwise unusable groundwater for 11,000 families through the construction of a reverse osmosis desalter with a capacity of five-million gallons-per-day in the Perris South Groundwater Subbasin. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because, in addition to reducing future demand for imported water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the Colorado River, project benefits include salinity management for expanded water recycling and protection of high-quality groundwater in adjacent basins.  

 

Project Title:  South Sacramento County Streams Project
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Sacramento County, CA
Amount Requested:  $6,800,000

The project includes constructing levees and floodwalls to increase the level of flood protection from 50-year flood event protection to a 200-year flood event. Completion of this project is essential to provide minimum 100-year protection to more than 100,000 residents and property valued at over $7 billion in the highly urbanized south Sacramento area. These public safety improvements will potentially save the taxpayer money by diminishing the frequency and significance of damage caused by flooding in this region.  The President’s Budget includes $4.8 million for this project.

 

Project Title:  South San Francisco Shoreline
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  South San Francisco Bay, CA
Amount Requested:  $2,800,000

The South San Francisco Bay Shoreline Study is necessary to provide flood protection for Silicon Valley and to facilitate tidal wetland habitat restoration. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because this flood protection will protect approximately 42,800 acres, and 7,400 homes and businesses, as well as major highways, parks and airports.

 

Project Title:  Success Dam, Tule River, CA (Dam Safety)
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Tulare County, CA
Amount Requested:  $10,000,000

Success Dam is an earthen flood control dam on the Tule River in the southern San Joaquin Valley.  Army Corps studies have determined that in the event of an earthquake, Success Dam could collapse, causing significant damage and loss of life in communities downstream.  Until the repair is completed, Success Reservoir cannot be filled to its normal capacity, causing an on-going reduction in water supplies to farms in a region that are already experiencing serious water shortages. This project is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will help eliminate the safety risk posed by the dam in its current state, providing mitigation of flood risk to personal and property safety. Additionally, these improvements will allow reservoir storage to be maximized. The President’s Budget includes $500,000 for this project.

 

Project Title:  Suisun Bay Channel
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Suisun Bay, CA
Amount Requested:  $5,275,000

Funding will go towards annual dredging and maintenance of the Suisun Bay Channel and New York Slough Channel to the authorized depth of minus 35 feet in these channel sections. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because annual maintenance is essential to the continued safe transport of crude oil and other bulk materials through San Francisco Bay. The President’s Budget includes $2.98 million for this project.

Project Title:  Sun Valley Watershed
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Approximately 14 miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles, CA
Amount Requested:  $800,000

This project will provide relief to the Sun Valley area of Los Angeles from severe, chronic flooding due to inadequate protection and run-off channels. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will improve flood protection for the area, and reduce heavy pollutant run-off into the ocean.

 

Project Title:  Sutter County
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location: Yuba City and Sutter County, CA
Amount Requested:  $675,000

The Sutter County Feasibility Study will investigate measures to improve the level of flood protection for Yuba City from a 100-year event to the maximum level feasible.  During a levee failure, flooding would reach depths of 10-15 feet in some locations and cause substantial damages to many residential and commercial-industrial structures, with more than 65,000 people and over $2 billion in property at risk. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will help protect public and private property from damage inflicted by flooding. The President’s Budget includes $339,000 for this project.

 

Project Title:  Tahoe Basin, CA & NV
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Lake Tahoe, CA
Amount Requested:  $9,500,000

Lake Tahoe is designated in the Clean Water Act as an Outstanding National Resource Water due to startling clarity and unique alpine environment.  However, the Lake’s habitats have been substantially altered through development and construction activities resulting in significant losses in water quality and ecosystem diversity.  The principal purposes of this study are to examine implementing activities to improve environmental quality at Lake Tahoe, especially water quality, wetlands habitat and other environmental restoration opportunities.  This study is a beneficial use of taxpayer funding because Lake Tahoe is a valuable environmental resource that provides the foundation for nearly all of the economic development in the Tahoe Basin. 

 

Project Title:  Tahoe Basin Restoration, CA & NV
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Lake Tahoe, CA
Amount Requested:  $8,567,000

Natural habitats throughout the Lake Tahoe Basin have been substantially impacted by development and construction, resulting in significant losses in water quality and ecosystem diversity.  Funding will allow the Army Corps to continue restoration, storm water master planning activities, and aquatic invasive species control. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will restore water quality, protect the area from flooding and help eradicate aquatic invasive species.

 

Project Title:  Tahoe Partnership, CA & NV
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Lake Tahoe, CA
Amount Requested:  $1,000,000

The Lake Tahoe Basin is in the midst of an extensive watershed restoration program to preserve this wild and scenic region. Funding will allow the Army Corps to continue providing technical assistance and planning for projects. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will provide recreation opportunities, support critical habitat for native flora and fauna, and protect this sensitive ecosystem.

 

Project Title:  Upper Guadalupe River
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Santa Clara County, CA
Amount Requested:  $12,500,000

The Upper Guadalupe River Flood Protection project will provide flood protection for 7,500 homes in Santa Clara County with potential damages from a 100-year flood event exceeding $280 million. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will prevent potential damages from flooding.

 

Project Title:  Ventura Harbor
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Ventura County, CA
Amount Requested:  $4,225,000

Funding will provide for annual dredging and to complete the breakwater repair within the federal channel area of Ventura Harbor. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because dredging is necessary for the continued operation of the port, and to ensure continued employment associated with the commercial fishing industry in the Port of Ventura. The President’s Budget includes $2.84 million for this project.

 

Project Title:  Visalia Flood Control, CA
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Visalia, CA
Amount Requested:  $100,000

When the Federal Emergency Management Agency completed their remapping of Visalia, it was determined that roughly 8,900 parcels are in the flood plain.  Along with several thousand homes that remained in the plain, the City is left with nearly 30 percent of its parcels in the flood plain.  Visalia is currently working to identify flood control projects that might remove affected homes from danger, and to determine cost/benefit analyses for these projects - including the levee reconstruction, upgrading existing water diversion structures, and raising the banks of the Friant-Kern Canal.  In the absence of flood remediation, flooding could jeopardize hundreds of homes and businesses.  Should this occur, much of the cost would fall to the federal government in the form of federal disaster assistance. Therefore, it is in the taxpayer’s interest to mitigate this risk.

 

Project Title:  West Sacramento Flood Control
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  West Sacramento, CA
Amount Requested:  $8,100,000

The West Sacramento Levee Reconstruction project will improve the level of flood protection for the City of West Sacramento and its surrounding community to a minimum of 200-year storm protection. Eliminating levee deficiencies is in the interest of the taxpayer as it will reduce the threat of flooding in West Sacramento, an area with 47,000 residents and over $3 billion in property value, and thus reduce the potential costs to taxpayers for property damage resulting from such flooding. The President’s Budget includes $5 million for this project.

 

Project Title:  Westminster (East Garden Grove) Watershed
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  East Garden Grove, CA
Amount Requested:  $279,000

This study by the Army Corps of Engineers focuses on flood control, ecosystem restoration and water quality solutions for the Westminster-East Garden Grove Watershed.  Periodic repairs to levees have been made, but these isolated actions do not address the overall need for significantly improved levee and other protection systems.  Funding will be used to develop solutions for more comprehensive flood protection with the additional objectives of ecosystem restoration and water quality improvement. This study is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will mitigate flood risk while providing ecosystem restoration and water quality improvement.

 

Project Title:  Whittier Narrows Dam
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Los Angeles County, CA
Amount Requested:  $466,000

These funds will be used by the Army Corps of Engineers to complete their environmental documentation for storing additional water behind Whittier Narrows Dam, which will be used to recharge groundwater and result in an increase in the local water supply. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because the operational changes will result in improved water supply reliability for the region by reducing the need for imported water, while ensuring that flood control protection and environmental regulations are maintained.

 

Project Title:   Yuba River Basin
Recipient:  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location:  Yuba County, CA
Amount Requested:  $18,800,000

The project involves levee improvements that will provide 200-year level flood protection in the Marysville areas. This work is in the interest of the taxpayer because levee repair will reduce the threat of flooding in the surrounding region, saving lives and reducing the potential costs to taxpayers for property damage resulting from such flooding.

 

Agency: Bureau of Reclamation

Project Title:  Anadromous Fish Screen Program, CVP: Sacramento River Division, CA
Recipient: Bureau of Reclamation
Location:  Sacramento and Sutter Counties, CA
Amount Requested:  $3,700,000

These two fish screen projects in Sutter and Sacramento Counties will consolidate and screen smaller water diversions from the Sacramento River to irrigation districts, and will improve water supply infrastructure and fishery protection.  This project represents the best efforts of local communities, working with State and federal agencies, to provide state-of-the-art fishery protection in conjunction with efficient water delivery to meet agricultural and human needs.  This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will provide anadromous fish species with protection, guarding juvenile salmon, steelhead trout, sturgeon, striped bass, and shad from entrainment, while simultaneously increasing water operation and management efficiencies.

 

Project Title: Bay Area Regional Water Recycling Program
Recipient:  Bay Area Clean Water Agencies; 2500 Pittsburg-Antioch Highway, Antioch, CA  94509-1373
Location: San Francisco Bay Area, CA
Amount Requested:  $8,000,000

The Bay Area Regional Water Recycling Program will develop and expand the use of recycled water to augment surface water supplies in the San Francisco Bay Area. These projects are a valuable use of taxpayer funds because they will help preserve overdrawn river and groundwater supplies, protect the environment, and improve the security and reliability of the Bay Area’s water systems.

 

Project Title: California Basins Groundwater Remediation Fund
Recipient:  Bureau of Reclamation
Location: Rialto, Colton and Fontana, CA
Amount Requested:  $5,000,000

Wells in the Inland Empire contaminated with perchlorate are impacting the water supplies of the cities of Rialto, Colton and Fontana. These funds will be used to install wellhead treatment systems. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will restore water supplies and clean up the groundwater in these cities and surrounding areas. This will benefit taxpayers by providing a safe and reliable source of drinking water for the region.

 

Project Title:  California Bay-Delta Restoration Program
Recipient:  Bureau of Reclamation
Location:  Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta and San Francisco Bay, CA
Amount Requested:  $50,000,000

In 2004, Congress authorized the expenditure of $389 million for the CALFED program (P.L. 108-361) to implement a balanced program for the Bay-Delta watershed, including water storage, ecosystem restoration, water supply reliability, conveyance, water use efficiency, water quality, water transfers, watersheds, the Environmental Water Account, levee stability, governance, and science. The CALFED program is a collaborative effort by more than 20 state and federal agencies to improve California’s water infrastructure. This program, which provides benefits across the State, is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will support ecological health and improve water management in California.  The President’s Budget includes $40 million for this program.

 

Project Title: Calleguas Municipal Water District Recycling Plant
Recipient:  Calleguas Municipal Water District; 2100 Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360
Location:  Ventura County, CA
Amount Requested:  $2,851,288

The Calleguas Municipal Water District Recycling Plant will provide critical support to the mission of providing safe and reliable drinking water to the 560,000 people living in the District’s service area. The District currently imports all of its water supply (over 110,000 acre-feet annually) from the California Water Project. This project will result in the reclamation and reuse of over 50,000 acre-feet of reclaimed water annually for nonpotable purposes. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will replace water that would otherwise have to be imported, with the added benefit of water supply in case of delivery interruptions due to natural disasters.  The President’s Budget includes $1.4 million for this project.

 

Project Title: El Dorado Temperature Control Device
Recipient:  Bureau of Reclamation - Central Valley Project: American River Division
Location:  Folsom Reservoir, El Dorado County, CA
Amount Requested:  $920,000

The Bureau of Reclamation, in consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, required the El Dorado Irrigation District to install a temperature control device at their water intake at Folsom Reservoir, in order to preserve the cold-water pool for downstream beneficial uses and Steelhead Trout and winter-run Chinook Salmon.  All of the funds appropriated for this project will be utilized for design and construction of the device. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will support development in the area and protect this critical habitat for native and endangered species.

 

Project Title:  Imperial Dam Electrification Rehabilitation Project, CA
Recipient: Imperial Irrigation District, 333 East Barioni Blvd., Imperial, CA 92251
Location:  Imperial, CA
Amount Requested:  $5,000,000

Of California’s 4.4 million acre-feet annual allotment of Colorado River water, 3.8 million comes through the Imperial Dam.  The electrical system that operates the dam is 75 years old and needs to be replaced.  The Dam is owned by the Bureau of Reclamation, but is operated and maintained by the Imperial Irrigation District.  Major electrical and other mechanical components at the dam are at, or beyond, the end of their useful-service life.  The system no longer meets design and safety standards and system failure could prevent California from accessing one of its major sources of water.  This funding will be used to begin the four-year, $40 million rehabilitation of the electrical system.  This is a beneficial use of taxpayer funds because of the risk that Imperial Dam could be crippled if one of these antiquated components were to fail.

 

Project Title:  Lake Cachuma (Cachuma Project), CA
Recipient: Santa Barbara County; 610 Mission Canyon Rd., Santa Barbara, CA 93105
Location:  Santa Barbara County, CA
Amount Requested:  $2,200,000

As a result of a biological opinion issued by the National Marine Fisheries Service, the Bureau of Reclamation is preparing to raise the level of Lake Cachuma to capture, retain and subsequently release additional water for the protection of habitat for endangered steelhead trout.  This action will impact critical water treatment and sewage facilities already in place, which were developed and paid for by the citizens of Santa Barbara County.  This project is a valuable use of taxpayer funding because it will accommodate surcharging the lake to protect critical wildlife habitat, while at the same time upgrading water treatment and distribution systems to meet increasingly stringent public health and safety regulations for these systems for growing public usage.

 

Project Title:  Lake Tahoe Regional Wetlands: Snow Creek
Recipient:  County of Placer; 3091 County Center Drive, Auburn, CA  95803
Location:  Placer County, CA
Amount Requested:  $2,200,000

Placer County has developed a restoration design plan for sensitive wetlands that have been damaged by past development. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will lead to improvements in water quality and environmental benefits. The President’s Budget includes $96,000 for this program. 

 

Project Title:  Lower Chino Dairy Area Desalination and Reclamation
Recipient: Bureau of Reclamation
Location:  Riverside County, CA
Amount Requested:  $3,100,000

The Inland Empire Utility Agency and Western Municipal Water District are building desalters in the Chino Basin, which will produce 37,000 acre-feet per year of potable water from a highly degraded and briny groundwater aquifer.  This project expands the existing Chino Desalters by adding six groundwater extraction wells, associated pipelines, reverse osmosis treatment and pumping stations for an additional 10.5 million gallons of water per day, or 11,000 acre-feet per year.   The Bureau of Reclamation has identified this project as a top priority due to its use of emerging brine concentration technology.  This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will provide 37,000 acre-feet per year of potable water.  This resource will replace water that otherwise would have to be imported, with the added benefit of water supply in case of delivery interruptions due to natural disasters. 

 

Project Title:  Madera Water Supply Enhancement
Recipient:  Madera Irrigation District; 12152 Road 28 1/4, Madera, CA 93637
Location:  Madera County, CA
Amount Requested:  $2,000,000

The Madera Irrigation District is in the process of developing recharge, recovery and delivery systems to help the District conserve and more efficiently use its water supplies. This project will allow for storage of water in a water bank, to be used when surface supplies run short.

 

Project Title:  Mokelumne River Regional Water Storage and Conjunctive Use
Recipient:  Bureau of Reclamation
Location:  County of San Joaquin, CA
Amount Requested:  $1,000,000

This study will review options for additional water capture and storage on the Mokelumne River for San Joaquin County. The East San Joaquin Groundwater Basin is over-drafted by up to 150,000 acre-feet per year, leading to a degradation of groundwater quantity and quality.  When completed, the project is intended to secure additional surface water supplies, prevent saline intrusion, and improve water supply.  This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will significantly improve groundwater quantity and quality.

 

Project Title: North Bay Water Reuse Program
Recipient:  North Bay Water Reuse Authority; 404 Aviation Boulevard, Santa Rosa, CA  95403
Location:  Marin, Napa, and Sonoma Counties, CA
Amount Requested:  $6,100,000

The North Bay Water Reuse Project is a partnership of water and wastewater agencies in Marin, Sonoma and Napa Counties that are constructing a recycled water supply, storage and distribution system to provide recycled water for agricultural, urban and environmental uses in the North Bay. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will help to ensure that agricultural, urban and environmental water supply needs are met by maximizing the valuable resource of recycled water.

 

Project Title: Quagga and Zebra Mussel Research
Recipient:  The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California; 700 North Alameda Street, P.O. Box 54153, Los Angeles, CA 90054
Location:  Los Angeles, CA
Amount Requested:  $10,200,000

The requested funding would be used to study solutions to halt the spread of invasive Quagga and Zebra mussels in the Western United States. In the last year Quagga mussels have been found in the Colorado River system and Zebra mussels were discovered in California in January 2008. Mussel infestations can devastate aquatic ecology of lakes and rivers; clog intakes and raw water conveyance systems; alter or destroy fish habitats; and render lakes more susceptible to deleterious algae blooms. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because control and eradication solutions developed will be applicable across other sites of infestation. Additionally, the cost to taxpayers, should this infestation spread, will be infinitely higher than the cost of eradication and control of the current population.

 

Project Title:  Rancho California Water District
Recipient:  Rancho California Water District; 42135 Winchester Road, Temecula, CA 92590
Location:  Riverside County, CA
Amount Requested:  $2,000,000

This project will provide cost-effective and sustainable water supplies to meet local demands. It will provide recycled water reuse of 16,000 acre feet per year by converting water in agriculture areas to recycled water systems and increasing the annual seasonal storage in Vail Lake reservoir by 10,000 acre feet per year.

 

Project Title:  Red Bluff Diversion Dam Fish Passage
Recipient:  Bureau of Reclamation
Location:  Red Bluff, CA
Amount Requested:  $61,300,000

The fish passage project at the Red Bluff Diversion Dam is the last major water project to be screened on the Sacramento River. The project will ensure a reliable water supply for 150,000 acres.  This project was allocated $109.814 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, but requires additional funding.  This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will protect the spawning habitat above the dam, which is responsible for 80 percent of the commercial salmon catch in the Pacific Ocean, and ensure a reliable water supply for 150,000 acres of farm land.  The President’s Budget includes $39.9 million for this project.

 

Project Title:  Riverside-Corona Feeder
Recipient:  Western Municipal Water District; 450 Alessandro Boulevard, Riverside, CA 92508
Location:  Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, CA
Amount Requested:  $1,000,000

The Riverside-Corona Feeder project connects four groundwater basins so imported water from wet years can be stored in a basin with excess capacity, and can be easily transferred between adjacent basins. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will increase water supplies, reduce water costs and improve water quality as well as reduce regional dependence on imported water.

 

Project Title:   San Bernardino Basin Clean Water Factory
Recipient:  San Bernardino Municipal Water Department; 444 West Rialto Avenue, San Bernardino, CA 92401
Location:  San Bernardino County, CA
Amount Requested:  $1,000,000

The San Bernardino Basin Clean Water Factory is a recycled water-for-groundwater recharge project, necessitated by the lack of both artificial and natural recharge. The Factory will employ advanced treatment technologies to produce quality water that meets or exceeds reuse requirements.  The recycled water will offset demands on imported water. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because the project has the ability to provide a sustainable and reliable source of water to this region in a cost-effective, environmentally safe manner.

 

Project Title:  San Diego Region Four-Reservoir Intertie
Recipient:  Sweetwater Authority; 505 Garrett Avenue, Chula Vista, CA 91910
Location:  San Diego County, CA
Amount Requested:  $1,380,000

Funding will initiate a feasibility study to connect the City of San Diego’s San Vicente, El Capitan, and Murray reservoirs and the Sweetwater Authority’s Loveland reservoir. The unused capacity of these reservoirs is a significant water storage volume that could be better used if imported water was piped to the reservoirs and efficiently re-operated. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because connecting to the imported water system will allow San Diego to store more water in wet years. Therefore, this benefits taxpayers by improving the area’s water supply.

 

Project Title:  San Gabriel Basin Restoration Fund, CA
Recipient: San Gabriel Basin Water Quality Authority, 1720 West Cameron Ave., Suite #100, West Covina, CA 91710
Location:  West Covina, CA
Amount Requested:  $5,000,000

The San Gabriel Groundwater Basin covers more than 160-square miles in Los Angeles County and is the primary source of drinking water for nearly three million people.  The San Gabriel Basin Restoration Fund is administered cooperatively by the San Gabriel Basin Water Quality Authority and the Bureau of Reclamation.  This funding will be used to further the design, construction, and operation of water projects to contain and treat the spreading groundwater contamination in the San Gabriel and central Groundwater Basins.  The plume of contamination in these two Los Angeles County groundwater basins is spreading at the rate of several miles per year.  This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because this project will help ensure a safe and reliable drinking water supply for millions of people.

 

Project Title:  San Joaquin River Restoration Fund
Recipient:  Bureau of Reclamation 
Location:  San Joaquin River, CA
Amount Requested:  $30,000,000

Funding will provide for planning, engineering, environmental compliance, fishery management, water operations, and public involvement activities related to the restoration and water management goals set forth in the Omnibus Public Lands Management Act of 2009 (P.L. 111-11). This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will restore and maintain fish populations in the San Joaquin River mainstem, including naturally-reproducing and self-sustaining populations of salmon and other fish. It also will reduce or avoid adverse water supply impacts to all of the Friant division long-term contractors that may result from the Interim Flows and Restoration Flows provided for in federal law.

 

Project Title:  San Jose Area Water Reclamation and Reuse Program
Recipient:  Bureau of Reclamation 
Location:  San Jose, Santa Clara, and Milpitas, CA
Amount Requested:  $3,000,000

These federal funds go toward building 105 miles of pipeline to deliver recycled water for industrial and irrigational use in these cities.  The project enables San Jose to meet federally-mandated water standards and reduce wastewater discharge into the San Francisco Bay.  The system produces 8,600 acre-feet of recycled water per year. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will increase water supply reliability and water quality, and protect endangered species by reducing wastewater discharges into San Francisco Bay.  The President’s Budget includes $242,000 for this project. 

 

Project Title:  Watsonville Area Water Recycling Project
Recipient:  City of Watsonville; 250 Main Street, Watsonville, CA 95076
Location:  Monterey and Santa Cruz Counties, CA
Amount Requested:  $3,300,000

This project will recycle 4,000 acre feet per year of water that is currently discharged to the ocean.  The recycled water will be treated, filtered and disinfected using tertiary treatment. The treated effluent will be blended with other water sources to reduce its salinity to levels that will allow irrigation of high-value food crops. The project will reduce pumping of groundwater from the over-drafted basin that underlies the Watsonville and Pajaro Valley areas.  As a result of the over drafting of the basin, wells are experiencing sea water intrusion to the extent that they have to be abandoned. This project is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will provide a reliable source of water for agricultural use, and will prevent the over-draft that has led to the intrusion of sea water.

 

Project Title:  Yuma Desalting Plant
Recipient: Bureau of Reclamation
Location:  Imperial County, CA and Yuma County, AZ
Amount Requested:  $4,000,000

The Yuma Desalting Plant is an existing Bureau of Reclamation facility located adjacent to the Colorado River.  Recent drought conditions, increased demand, and supply reliability concerns in the Colorado River Basin have renewed interest in operating the plant to conserve additional water in the Colorado River system reservoirs.  This request will fund a pilot program to allow for additional testing and data collection, which will help determine whether any additional improvements to the Plant are necessary to ensure reliable medium and long-term operation beyond those already identified by the Bureau, and the cost implications of such improvements.  This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will improve current water supply reliability for 18 million people in Southern California during persistent drought conditions and pumping restrictions in the San Francisco Bay/Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta estuary.  Additionally, it will provide an opportunity to explore efficient treatment procedures, the feasibility of utilizing renewable energy, and alternatives to brine disposal, assisting in developing a longer-term cost effective operation of the Plant and further enhancing Reclamation’s drought preparedness. 

 

Agency: Department of Energy

 

Project Title:  CSU Biotechnology Partnerships for Next Generation Biofuels Production
Recipient: The California State University Program for Education and Research in Biotechnology, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA 92182-1011
Location:  Alameda, Los Angeles, and San Diego Counties, CA
Amount Requested:  $1,500,000

The California State University is developing and expanding workforce training and applied research programs located in the regional biotechnology, biofuels, and biomass-producing clusters of San Francisco Bay, Los Angeles, San Diego, and the Central and Imperial Valleys tailored specifically to California's emerging biofuels industry. This initiative will provide career development workshops and job placements in research and development laboratories, pilot plants and biofuel production facilities. The impetus for the project is to significantly accelerate workforce training statewide, a step that is critical to advancing biofuels development and commercial-scale bio-refinery projects in order to build economically feasible and sustainable biofuel production systesm for the nation and California. Once California State University has developed the initial program, they expect it to be self-sustaining through industry partnerships and grants. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funding because it will provide much needed employment training and access to applied resarch opportunities in the burgeoning fields of biotechnolgoy and biofuels industries.


Project Title:  City of San Jose Smart LEED Streetlights, CA
Recipient: City of San Jose, 200 East Santa Clara Street, 18th Floor, San Jose, CA 95113-1905
Location:  City of San Jose
Amount Requested:  $600,000

The City of San Jose is installing 800 next generation “smart” streetlights, which have Low-Emitting Diode (LED) bulbs.  These streetlights will reduce maintenance costs through fewer changed bulbs, provide better nighttime visibility, can be programmed to dim when there is minimal traffic, and use less energy than traditional streetlights.  Initially, 100 of the streetlights will be equipped with a charging station for electric vehicles in high-density residential areas without readily-accessible electricity (condos/apartments without garages and street parking only).  This project is a valuable use of taxpayer funding because it will greatly improve the City’s energy efficiency.  Investing in clean energy will not only help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and decrease the country’s dependence on fossil fuels, but will also create green jobs and contribute to long-term economic growth.

 

Project Title:  City of Yreka Biomass Facility, CA
Recipient: City of Yreka, 701 4th Street, Yreka, California 96097
Location:  City of Yreka
Amount Requested:  $500,000

Due to the removal of the Klamath River dams, the hydrological power that provides electricity to Siskiyou County residents must be replaced.  Yreka is planning a 20 megawatt biomass facility that will generate enough power for city and adjacent residents.  The plant will be a public/private partnership with a local timber producer, which will supply wood waste from its existing operations to fuel the plant. The biomass plant will also produce enough excess steam to allow the timber company to expand its operations (and workforce) to dry its product on-site.  Drying the veneer in Yreka will reduce the company’s carbon footprint by eliminating the need to truck the veneer to the current fossil fuel-based drying facility outside of the county.  This effort is a valuable use of taxpayer funding because it will assist a severely disadvantaged rural community by providing up to 150 jobs to combat the 17.6 percent local unemployment rate.  Additionally, the project will improve the health of the National Forest by utilizing wood waste, and will reduce fossil fuel consumption and carbon emissions through improved business practices, thus bolstering the national goal of investing in a green infrastructure and workforce.


Project Title:  Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Old Town Demolition
Recipient: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 90702
Location:  Berkeley, CA
Amount Requested:  $20,000,000

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is seeking to expand its modern, energy efficient and seismically safe facilities for conducting advanced energy research.  This funding will assist with site cleanup and demolition of sub-par World War II Old Town facilities, and allow for the development of new and more productive research and technology development infrastructure.  This remediation project would include the decontamination and demolition of Old Town buildings, removal of any potentially contaminated soil, and installation of groundwater treatment systems if necessary.  This project will benefit the taxpayer by remediating contaminated buildings and land, which will allow the Lab to fully utilize its resources and lead to additional scientific discoveries.

 

Project Title:  Mendocino County for the Strategic Woody-Biomass Initiative
Recipient: County of Mendocino, 501 Low Gap Road, Suite 1010, Ukiah, CA 95482
Location:  County of Mendocino
Amount Requested:  $450,000

Mendocino County has commenced initial studies for two biomass power production facilities: a 15 megawatt combined heat and power facility in Fort Bragg on an old sawmill bark dumpsite, and another in Ukiah.  The County intends to collect waste from lumber mills (currently trucked 400 miles out of town) and brush from fuels reduction projects (typically burned on-site, or left in piles that become an even greater fire danger).  This funding would assist the County initiate its request with the California Independent System Operator, engineering, and environmental review.  This is a valuable use of taxpayer funding because it will enhance the renewable energy capacity of the County.  Additionally, in the last decade, Mendocino has lost three sawmills and a paper plant, and this project will keep timber workers employed.

 

Project Title:  National Ignition Campaign
Recipient:  Department of Energy
Location:  Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA
Amount Requested:  $395,000,000

The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) is a national science and technology effort within the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion community to achieve ignition in the laboratory for the first time in world history. The National Ignition Campaign is scheduled to initiate ignition experiments in 2010 at the National Ignition Facility, a 192-laser beam facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Campaign is comprised of several simultaneous research and development activities to support the goal of achieving ignition in the laboratory. NIC funds development of experiment support technologies (optics, diagnostics and cryogenics), facility operations and target production for NIC experiments, research and development and advanced computation simulations to export experiments and design efforts.  This funding will bolster the National Ignition Campaign’s plan for a credible ignition attempt. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because the Campaign will provide the scientific understanding to assess the safety, security, and reliability of the nation’s nuclear weapons without nuclear testing.  The President’s Budget includes $380 million for this project.

 

Project Title:  San Francisco Bay Area Biosolids to Energy Project, CA
Recipient: Delta Diablo Sanitation District, 2500 Pittsburg-Antioch Highway, Antioch, CA 94509
Location:  San Francisco Bay Area, CA
Amount Requested:  $2,000,000

Bay Area Biosolids to Energy Coalition is an association of 17 agencies, including San Francisco Public Utilities Commission and sanitation districts in San Mateo, Marin, Solano, Contra Costa, and Alameda Counties.  The Coalition is planning a facility to convert treated biosolids - a sludge produced in the process of meeting federal water quality mandates - into energy.  Today, most of the treated biosolids produced in the Bay Area are deposited in landfills or spread on agricultural land.  A growing number of counties and regulatory agencies are enacting ordinances banning these practices, which means that the biosolids will be transported greater distances.  This facility would be the first of its kind in the country.  The Coalition has completed one air quality assessment and will use the requested funding, along with local matching funds, to begin a more comprehensive environmental review.  This project is a valuable use of taxpayer funding because it will greatly improve energy efficiency utilizing a renewable resource, and will address multiple issues facing the San Francisco Bay Region, including reducing greenhouse gas emissions, meeting federal water quality mandates, developing a sustainable green energy supply, and addressing environmental justice concerns of communities.

 

Project Title:  University of California, Merced Solar Power Forecasting
Recipient: University of California, Merced, 5200 North Lake Road, Merced, CA 95343
Location:  Merced, CA
Amount Requested:  $2,000,000

The University of California, Merced is seeking to start a Solar Power Forecasting Center, which would use satellite and radar data to determine where and when the most solar energy could be captured in California, due to changes in the atmosphere, etc.  This will be used by solar companies to better plan their solar installations and manage solar generation within the electrical grid.  This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because the data produced by this project will allow for the more effective and efficient deployment of solar technologies, and help California meet the requirements of the State’s environmental law, AB 32.

 

Project Title:  University of California, San Diego Earthquake Simulator
Recipient: University of California, San Diego; 9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0043, La Jolla, CA 92093
Location:  La Jolla, CA
Amount Requested:  $2,000,000

The University of California, San Diego has a “shake table” that allows engineers to perform earthquake safety tests on full-size buildings (weighing up to 2,220 tons and 100-feet tall).  The University is seeking funds to upgrade the “shake table” to 6 degrees of freedom to allow for more advanced testing – so they can shake a test building from every angle, simulating multiple earthquakes, recreating the most devastating earthquakes on record.  This upgrade will allow UC San Diego’s shake table to match the world’s only other 6 Degree facility in Japan.  This is a valuable use of taxpayer funding because experimental testing of large structural systems under realistic earthquake loads is limited by the current domestic capacity of existing shake tables.  Critical infrastructure components and systems should be tested at a facility capable of handling full scale test articles and subjecting them to multiple degrees of freedom earthquake motion to characterize their seismic response performance, validate predictive codes, and develop damage mitigation strategies.  This project will ultimately allow for improved seismic retrofitting practices, which will greatly improve public safety.

 

Project Title:  Western Riverside County Regional Energy Efficiency and Water Conservation Retrofit Improvements Program
Recipient: Western Riverside Council of Governments, 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor, Riverside, CA 92501
Location:  Riverside County
Amount Requested:  $4,000,000

The Western Riverside Council of Governments is requesting funds to initiate a program to assist property owners with retrofitting homes and businesses with energy efficient and water conservation improvements.  The program will provide low-interest loans for the purchase of solar panels, efficient heating/cooling systems, doors and windows, with repayment being made through annual property tax installments.  The cities plan to issue municipal revenue bonds to pay for the majority of this program, which they expect will lead to retrofits of 28,500 older properties in the county.  This is a valuable use of taxpayer funding because it will provide financing to property owners for the installation of energy efficient and water conservation retrofit improvements, leading to substantial energy and water savings, and providing the areas rate payers with a significant decrease in the amount they have to pay.  Additionally, funding will bolster the areas construction jobs in a sector that has experienced significant losses due to the recent home-building decline, and provide the opportunity to train energy auditors.

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